BA - The Boeing Company

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
341.67
-4.62 (-1.33%)
At close: 4:00PM EST
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Previous close346.29
Open346.30
Bid341.45 x 1300
Ask341.60 x 800
Day's range341.10 - 349.31
52-week range292.47 - 446.01
Volume4530563
Avg. volume4,406,620
Market cap192B
Beta (5Y Monthly)1.24
PE ratio (TTM)51.43
EPS (TTM)6.64
Earnings date28 Jan 2020 - 3 Feb 2020
Forward dividend & yield8.22 (2.37%)
Ex-dividend date2019-11-07
1y target est374.45
  • Boeing bows out of multibillion-dollar Minuteman III replacement competition
    Reuters

    Boeing bows out of multibillion-dollar Minuteman III replacement competition

    Boeing Co has decided it will not compete as a prime contractor to replace the Pentagon's aging U.S.-based Minuteman III missile system, paving the way for Northrop Grumman Corp to win a contract worth tens of billions of dollars. Friday marked the deadline to submit proposals to continue work on the replacement of the nearly half-century-old intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) system as the military embarks on a costly modernization of its aging atomic weapons. Boeing said in a statement that it was disappointed it was unable to submit a bid.

  • Will Heico (HEI) Stock Continue Its Strong Run After Q4 Earnings?
    Zacks

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  • Financial Times

    FirstFT: Today’s top stories 

    in the UK general election, paving the way for Britain to leave the EU by the end of next month. since Margaret Thatcher’s victory in 1987, as traditional Labour voters in the industrial heartlands of the Midlands and north abandoned Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour party. With one seat left to declare, the prime minister, who campaigned on the slogan “Get Brexit done”, has secured a House of Commons majority of 79.

  • Financial Times

    Australia’s Qantas chooses Airbus over Boeing for longest routes 

    Qantas Airways has selected the Airbus A350-1000 as the preferred aircraft for the world’s longest direct flights, including routes between Sydney and London, following a competition with Boeing. “We’ll only commit to this investment if we know it will generate the right return for our shareholders given the inherent commercial risks,” Alan Joyce, Qantas chief executive, said on Friday.

  • Financial Times

    Opening Quote: Markets and business welcome emphatic Boris Johnson victory

    FT subscribers can click here to receive Opening quote by email. Boris Johnson’s emphatic general election victory has put sterling on course for one of its biggest ever one-day gains. The UK currency ...

  • Qantas selects Airbus over Boeing for world's longest flights
    Reuters

    Qantas selects Airbus over Boeing for world's longest flights

    Australia's Qantas Airways picked Airbus SE over Boeing Co as the preferred supplier for jets capable of the world's longest commercial flights from Sydney to London, dealing the U.S. planemaker its latest setback this year. The choice of up to 12 A350-1000 planes fitted with an extra fuel tank for flights of up to 21 hours cements Airbus as the leader in ultra-long haul flying globally at a time when Boeing is battling delays on its rival 777X programme and a broader corporate crisis following two deadly 737 MAX crashes. The Qantas flights would begin in the first half of 2023, but remain subject to the airline reaching a pay deal with pilots, who would need to extend their duty times to around 23 hours to account for potential delays and switch between flying the A350 and the airline's current A330 fleet.

  • Associated Press

    FAA boss said concerned Boeing eager for quick return of Max

    The head of the Federal Aviation Administration is concerned that Boeing is pushing for an unrealistically quick return of its grounded 737 Max and that there is a perception the company is pressuring the regulator, according to a senior FAA official. The official told Congress of FAA Administrator Stephen Dickson’s concerns on Thursday, shortly before Dickson met with Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg and another Boeing executive.

  • Associated Press

    American Airlines doesn't see Boeing Max flights until April

    American Airlines is pushing back the return of its Boeing 737 Max planes another month, removing the plane from its schedule until April 7. American said Thursday that it based the decision on the latest guidance from the Federal Aviation Administration, the Transportation Department and Boeing. American CEO Doug Parker has said Boeing, not American, will shoulder the cost of those cancellations.

  • Exclusive: Boeing delays plans for record 737 production until 2021 - sources
    Reuters

    Exclusive: Boeing delays plans for record 737 production until 2021 - sources

    SEATTLE/PARIS (Reuters) - Boeing Co has delayed plans to reach a record production rate of 57 737 jets per month next year, industry sources said on Thursday, even before the U.S. FAA announced a new delay in the 737 MAX's return to service which raised uncertainty over production plans. The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration said on Wednesday that the agency will not approve the grounded commercial jet for flight before year end, and said it was investigating production issues at the Boeing factory in Renton, Washington. FAA chief Steve Dickson, who met with Boeing Chief Executive Dennis Muilenburg on Thursday, is concerned that the U.S. airplane maker is pursuing a 737 MAX return-to-service schedule that is "not realistic," according to an email seen by Reuters.

  • Boeing scuttles 2019 timeline for 737 MAX return after CEO meets with U.S. FAA
    Reuters

    Boeing scuttles 2019 timeline for 737 MAX return after CEO meets with U.S. FAA

    Boeing Co on Thursday abandoned its goal of winning approval this month from the Federal Aviation Administration to unground the 737 MAX after Chief Executive Dennis Muilenburg met with senior U.S. aviation officials. The announcement came after a congressional hearing on Wednesday in which numerous lawmakers prodded the FAA to take a tougher line with Boeing as it continues to review the plane that has been grounded since March after two fatal crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia that killed 346 people. FAA Administrator Steve Dickson said on Wednesday he would not clear the plane to fly before 2020 and disclosed the agency has an ongoing investigation into 737 production issues in Renton, Washington.

  • Investing.com

    Stocks - Wall Street Hits New Highs on Trade Deal Reports

    Investing.com - The major stock indexes surged to new intraday highs, and the S&P; 500 and Nasdaq Composite indices closed at new records on reports that the United States and China have "an agreement in principle" on a phase one trade deal.

  • Southwest reaches partial compensation agreement with Boeing for MAX damages
    Reuters

    Southwest reaches partial compensation agreement with Boeing for MAX damages

    NEW YORK/WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Southwest Airlines Co said on Thursday it had reached a confidential compensation agreement with Boeing Co for a portion of projected financial damages arising from the grounding of its 737 MAX aircraft. The airline, the world's largest 737 MAX operator, also said it would share with its employees proceeds of about $125 million from Boeing. Southwest said it continues to engage in talks with Boeing for further compensation related to the MAX grounding, adding that the details of the talks and the settlement were confidential.

  • AFP

    Southwest, Boeing agree on compensation over 737 MAX

    Southwest Airlines said Thursday it reached a settlement with Boeing to provide compensation for losses tied to the grounding of 737 MAX jets nine months ago. The US airline also said it would share $125 million in profits with employees including pilots next year, though it did not disclose details of the amount or nature of compensation. The 737 MAX has been grounded since mid-March following two deadly crashes that left 346 people dead.

  • The Market Timing Secrets No One Talks About - December 12, 2019
    Zacks

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  • Southwest to share $125M from Boeing settlement with workers
    Associated Press

    Southwest to share $125M from Boeing settlement with workers

    Southwest Airlines will share about $125 million with its employees after reaching a partial settlement with Boeing over damages from the grounding of the airplane maker's 737 Max. Southwest, which had about 59,000 employees at the start of the year, said Thursday that the settlement covers only a portion of its projected damages from the Max grounding.

  • Financial Times

    Delta sees revenue growth continuing next year

    Delta Air Lines expects to fly through the “headwinds” of US election uncertainty and the return of Boeing’s 737 Max planes to competitors’ schedules to produce revenue growth of 4 to 6 per cent in 2020, the US carrier will tell investors on Thursday. Ed Bastian, chief executive, told the Financial Times that 2019 would be “the best year in Delta’s history by almost all measures”, and predicted that momentum would continue, allowing it to report diluted earnings per share of $6.75-$7.75 next year. Delta has claimed to have seen little advantage from not having the Max in its fleet at a time when rivals including Southwest and American have had to ground many of their planes for months after two fatal crashes.

  • China has 'important concerns' about Boeing 737 MAX design changes: regulator
    Reuters

    China has 'important concerns' about Boeing 737 MAX design changes: regulator

    BEIJING/SYDNEY (Reuters) - China has raised "important concerns" with Boeing Co regarding design changes proposed to end the grounding of the Boeing 737 MAX airliner, Beijing's aviation regulator said on Thursday, declining to say when it might fly in China again. The remarks broke months of public silence from China, the first country to ground the 737 MAX in March following the second deadly crash involving the model in less than five months.

  • Financial Times

    Boeing ‘unrealistic’ over timing of 737 Max return — FAA

    The US aviation regulator has accused Boeing of pushing it to recertify the 737 Max jet more quickly than it would like, in the latest sign that the company will have to wait longer than hoped before getting its troubled aircraft back in the air. Stephen Dickson, the head of the Federal Aviation Administration, was due to meet Dennis Muilenburg, the Boeing chief executive, on Thursday to discuss the Max, which has been grounded since March following the second of two fatal accidents, which killed 346 people in total.

  • AFP

    US aviation chief says Boeing 737 MAX won't be recertified until 2020

    The top US air transport regulator on Wednesday doused Boeing's hopes that its 737 MAX will return to the skies this year while lawmakers probed why the agency failed to ground the plane after the first of two tragic crashes. In an interview just ahead of a congressional hearing, Federal Aviation Administration chief Steve Dickson told CNBC the aircraft will not be cleared to fly before 2020. The process for approving the MAX's return to the skies still has 10 or 11 milestones left to complete, including a certification flight and a public comment period on pilot training requirements, the FAA chief said.

  • US aviation chief says Boeing 737 MAX won't be recertified until 2020
    AFP News

    US aviation chief says Boeing 737 MAX won't be recertified until 2020

    The top US air transport regulator on Wednesday doused Boeing's hopes that its 737 MAX will return to the skies this year while lawmakers probed why the agency failed to ground the plane after the first of two tragic crashes. In an interview just ahead of a congressional hearing, Federal Aviation Administration chief Steve Dickson told CNBC the aircraft will not be cleared to fly before 2020. The process for approving the MAX's return to the skies still has 10 or 11 milestones left to complete, including a certification flight and a public comment period on pilot training requirements, the FAA chief said.

  • FAA 'rolled the dice' on safety with 737 MAX - Rep. DeFazio
    Reuters Videos

    FAA 'rolled the dice' on safety with 737 MAX - Rep. DeFazio

    Representative Peter DeFazio, who chairs the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, said in his opening remarks that the FAA's own internal analysis, done after the fatal crash of a Lion Air 737 MAX flight in October of 2018, showed that a design flaw in the plane's software could result in "as many as 15 future fatal crashes." The software, known as the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, or MCAS, is an anti-stall system. A second 737 MAX, belonging to Ethiopian Airlines, crashed months later. DeFazio and other U.S. lawmakers questioned three top FAA officials on why the government agency didn't take more aggressive action to prevent the second crash. FAA Administrator Stephen Dickson told the committee, “We are humbled when our best efforts fail.” But, he added, “The system is not broken.”