TKECF - Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings, Incorporated

Other OTC - Other OTC Delayed Price. Currency in USD
2.9500
-0.0600 (-1.99%)
At close: 12:58PM EDT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close3.0100
Open2.9500
Bid0.0000 x 0
Ask0.0000 x 0
Day's range2.9500 - 2.9500
52-week range2.8000 - 5.1200
Volume300
Avg. volume2,909
Market cap4.651B
Beta (5Y monthly)0.70
PE ratio (TTM)8.19
EPS (TTM)0.3600
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend dateN/A
1y target estN/A
  • TEPCO Renewable to spend $9-18 billion by 2035 on green power
    Reuters

    TEPCO Renewable to spend $9-18 billion by 2035 on green power

    TEPCO Renewable Power, a unit of Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings <9501.T>, plans to spend about 1-2 trillion yen (£7.3-14.5 billion) to develop 6-7 gigawatts (GW) of offshore wind and hydroelectric power projects by 2035, its president said. "We aim to boost our profit to 100 billion yen in 2030 from 40 billion yen now" through the investments, Seiichi Fubasami, president of TEPCO Renewable Power, told Reuters last week in an interview. Its parent TEPCO, which has been struggling to restart nuclear power stations after the Fukushima disaster of 2011, said in 2018 that it will develop 2-3 GW of offshore wind power each at home and abroad, and 2-3 GW of hydroelectric power overseas to help renewable energy become a core power source.

  • Japan panel: Fukushima water release to sea is best option
    Associated Press

    Japan panel: Fukushima water release to sea is best option

    A Japanese government panel on Friday roughly accepted a draft proposal for releasing into the sea massive amounts of radioactive water now being stored at the tsunami-wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant. The economy and industry ministry's draft proposal said releasing the water gradually into the sea was the safer, more feasible method, though evaporation was also a proven method used after the 1979 Three Mile Island accident. Nearly nine years after the 2011 meltdowns of three reactor cores at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Plant, it was a small step toward deciding what to do with the water and follows expert recommendations.

  • Japan revises Fukushima cleanup plan, delays key steps
    Associated Press

    Japan revises Fukushima cleanup plan, delays key steps

    Japan on Friday revised a roadmap for the cleanup of the tsunami-wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant, further delaying the removal of thousands of spent fuel units that remain in cooling pools since the 2011 disaster. The government and the plant operator, Tokyo Electric Power Co., are keeping a 30- to 40-year completion target. More than 4,700 units of fuel rods remain at the three melted reactors and two others that survived the 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

  • Government proposes release of Fukushima water to sea or air
    Associated Press

    Government proposes release of Fukushima water to sea or air

    Japan's economy and industry ministry proposed on Monday the gradual release or evaporation of massive amounts of treated but still radioactive water being stored at the tsunami-wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant. It is meant to solve a growing problem for the plant's operator as storage space for the water runs out, despite fears of a backlash from the public. Nearly nine years after the 2011 meltdowns of three reactor cores at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Plant, radioactive water continues to accumulate as water used to keep the cores cool leaks from the damaged reactors and is stored in tanks so it won't escape into the ocean or elsewhere.

  • Fukushima melted fuel removal begins 2021, end state unknown
    Associated Press

    Fukushima melted fuel removal begins 2021, end state unknown

    Japan’s economy and industry ministry proposed a revision Monday to its decades-long road map to clean up the radioactive mess at the Fukushima nuclear power plant, which was wrecked by a massive earthquake and tsunami in 2011. Nearly nine years after the accident, the decommissioning of the plant, where three reactors melted, remains largely an uncertainty. The revised road map, to be formally approved later this month, lacks details on how the complex should look at the end but maintains a 30- to 40-year target to finish.

  • Reuters

    Tokyo Electric to give financial help to Japan Atomic Power

    Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings <9501.T> said on Monday it would provide financial support to Japan Atomic Power Co (Japco) [JATOM.UL] to help it take safety measures needed to restart its Tokai Daini nuclear power plant near Tokyo. Late last year, Japan's nuclear regulator approved an operations extension for the 40-year-old Tokai Daini reactor, which was damaged in the same earthquake and tsunami that sparked the Fukushima disaster in 2011. The approval was a boost for the operator, Japco, which is owned by the country's main utilities and is bleeding cash because of the shutdown of its two nuclear power units.

  • Associated Press

    Prosecutors appeal TEPCO acquittal in Fukushima case

    Prosecutors in the only criminal trial involving the 2011 Fukushima nuclear plant meltdown appealed Monday against the acquittal of three former Tokyo Electric Power Co. executives. The Tokyo District Court on Sept. 19 found ex-TEPCO chairman Tsunehisa Katsumata and two others not guilty of professional negligence in the disaster and the death of 44 elderly patients who were forcibly evacuated from local hospitals. The court said a tsunami of the size that hit the plant after an earthquake was unpredictable and the executives weren't required to take additional measures or to stop the reactors under government safety standards at that time.

  • Japan court: TEPCO execs not guilty in Fukushima disaster
    Associated Press

    Japan court: TEPCO execs not guilty in Fukushima disaster

    A Japanese court ruled Thursday that three former executives of Tokyo Electric Power Company were not guilty of professional negligence in the 2011 disaster at the Fukushima nuclear power plant because ensuring absolute safety at nuclear plants was not a government requirement at that time. The ruling by the Tokyo District Court ended the only criminal trial related to the nuclear accident that has kept tens of thousands of residents away from their homes because of lingering radiation contamination. Lawyers representing the 5,700 Fukushima residents who filed the criminal complaint said they will push prosecutors to appeal the decision.

  • Executives cleared over Japan nuclear disaster
    Reuters Videos

    Executives cleared over Japan nuclear disaster

    A Japanese court has cleared the only people to face criminal charges as a result of the Fukushima disaster. On Thursday (September 19), three former executives of Tokyo Electric Power were found not guilty of negligence. Outside the court, protesters expressed outrage at the verdict: (SOUNDBITE) (Japanese) RESIDENT OF FUKUSHIMA, KEIKO SASAKI, SAYING: "How could the court make this ruling? We cannot understand, and cannot accept it. For the past eight and a half years, there are many people who were forced to evacuate from their home, home town and still looking for a place to live." Their trial began more than two years ago. The company, also known as Tepco, operated the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear station. A powerful earthquake and tsunami in 2011 set off meltdowns in three of the plant's six reactors. It prompted Tokyo to shut down the country's entire fleet of nuclear reactors. And the radiation in water, food and air led to more than 160,000 people fleeing from their homes. All three executives have apologized for the triple meltdown. They say, however, they could not have foreseen the disaster. Prosecutors had said the three had access to data that anticipated the risk posed by a major tsunami. But the judge ruled that to hold them responsible the prosecuting lawyers had to prove it was possible to predict tsunamis - and complete preventive measures in time. Tepco says locating and removing Fukushima's melted fuel could take up to 40 years. The company must also soon decide what to do with more than a million tons of contaminated water stored at the plant. Japan's environment minister recently said he thought Tepco will be forced to dump the water into the Pacific Ocean as it runs out of room to store it. The government is waiting on a report from an expert panel before making a final decision.

  • Japan briefs diplomats on Fukushima nuclear water concerns
    Associated Press

    Japan briefs diplomats on Fukushima nuclear water concerns

    Japan tried to reassure foreign diplomats Wednesday about safety at the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant amid concerns about massive amounts of treated but radioactive water stored in tanks. Diplomats from 22 countries and regions attended a briefing at the Foreign Ministry, where Japanese officials stressed the importance of combating rumors about safety at the plant, which was decimated by a 2011 earthquake and tsunami, while pledging transparency. The plant's operator, Tokyo Electric Power Co., or TEPCO, said last month that it would run out of storage space for the water in 2022, prompting South Korea to raise safety questions amid tensions with Japan that have intensified over trade and history.

  • Japan's Tepco, Chubu, Hitachi, Toshiba to collaborate on nuclear plants
    Reuters

    Japan's Tepco, Chubu, Hitachi, Toshiba to collaborate on nuclear plants

    Tokyo Electric Power, <9501.T> Chubu Electric Power, <9502.T> Hitachi <6501.T> and Toshiba <6502.T> have agreed to consider cooperating on their nuclear plant businesses, the companies said in a statement on Wednesday. The companies have agreed to consider together building a sustainable business that focuses on constructing and operating boiling water reactors (BWRs) similar to the ones that melted down at Tokyo Electric's Fukushima plant north of Tokyo after an earthquake and tsunami in 2011. Japan shut down its nuclear plants nationwide in the wake of the 2011 disaster.

  • Reuters

    Exclusive: Japanese utilities start selling uranium fuel into depressed market

    Japan's nuclear operators are starting to sell some of their huge holdings of uranium fuel, as chances fade of restarting many more reactors eight years after the Fukushima nuclear disaster. The sales so far have been small, but were made at values well below their purchase price and are likely to further depress the already beaten-down uranium market, say two senior market specialists.

  • Japan utility to scrap 4 more reactors in Fukushima
    Associated Press

    Japan utility to scrap 4 more reactors in Fukushima

    The operator of the nuclear plant wrecked by a 2011 earthquake and tsunami said Wednesday that it will decommission four more reactors in northeastern Japan in addition to those already being scrapped. Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings said a final decision on dismantling the four reactors at the Fukushima Dai-ni plant will be formally approved at a board meeting, expected later this month. Nearby Fukushima Dai-ichi had meltdowns in three reactors and structural damage in a fourth during the disaster.