Singapore markets open in 32 minutes
  • Straits Times Index

    3,282.88
    +13.02 (+0.40%)
     
  • S&P 500

    4,145.19
    -6.75 (-0.16%)
     
  • Dow

    32,803.47
    +76.67 (+0.23%)
     
  • Nasdaq

    12,657.55
    -63.04 (-0.50%)
     
  • BTC-USD

    23,289.88
    +308.55 (+1.34%)
     
  • CMC Crypto 200

    542.49
    +7.27 (+1.36%)
     
  • FTSE 100

    7,439.74
    -8.32 (-0.11%)
     
  • Gold

    1,788.40
    -2.80 (-0.16%)
     
  • Crude Oil

    88.26
    -0.75 (-0.84%)
     
  • 10-Yr Bond

    2.8400
    +0.1640 (+6.13%)
     
  • Nikkei

    28,127.34
    -48.53 (-0.17%)
     
  • Hang Seng

    20,201.94
    +27.94 (+0.14%)
     
  • FTSE Bursa Malaysia

    1,501.55
    -6.16 (-0.41%)
     
  • Jakarta Composite Index

    7,084.65
    +27.30 (+0.39%)
     
  • PSE Index

    6,405.50
    -77.61 (-1.20%)
     

Go-slow fuel protesters block motorways across Britain bringing rush hour chaos

·5-min read
Rush hour chaos as fuel price protests block motorways - SWNS/SWNS
Rush hour chaos as fuel price protests block motorways - SWNS/SWNS

Drivers are facing more chaos during this morning’s rush hour as campaigners blocked motorways in a protest over soaring fuel prices.

Protesters created a rolling blockade along the M4, heading towards the Prince of Wales bridge. Similar demonstrations are also expected in Yorkshire and Essex.

The M4 has now been closed in both directions near the Severn Bridge due to the protests.

Police warned of “serious disruption throughout the day”, with motorists urged to stay at home where possible.

It comes amid growing discontent about the surging cost of petrol and diesel on petrol station forecourts, which has been driven higher by Russia’s war in Ukraine.

But motoring groups have complained that pump prices have remained high even after wholesale costs began to fall back.

The average price of a litre of petrol at UK forecourts reached a new high of 191.5p on Sunday, according to data firm Experian.

The average price of diesel was 199.0p per litre.

Among those gathering at Magor services, near Caldicot, was Vicky Stamper, 41.

The former HGV driver, from Cwmbran, said she and her partner Darren had to leave jobs in Bristol because they could not afford the fuel any longer.

She said: "We had to leave those jobs because it was costing us £380 a week just to get to and from work.

"I then lost a job two weeks ago because the company couldn't afford to put fuel in that many lorries so last in, first out."

She said the situation has taken an emotional toll on her and her family.

Talking about the disruption the protest will cause to drivers, Ms Stamper added: "We're doing this for us and for them. If they want to have a moan, they should join us instead."

Asked what she would ask Prime Minister Boris Johnson to do, she said: "Resign."

Rush hour chaos as fuel price protests block motorways - Mark Cosgrove/News Images /News Images
Rush hour chaos as fuel price protests block motorways - Mark Cosgrove/News Images /News Images
Rush hour chaos as fuel price protests block motorways - Tom Wren/SWNS
Rush hour chaos as fuel price protests block motorways - Tom Wren/SWNS

Howard Cox, founder of the FairFuelUK Campaign, said: "These are not just demonstrations against the record excruciatingly high petrol and diesel prices that rise each and every day.

"They are also about the sickening chronic manipulation of pump prices and the complete lack of scrutiny by our out of touch Government, in allowing unchecked petrol and diesel profiteering to run rife."

Devon and Cornwall Police tweeted: "We are aware of a go-slow protest having commenced at 7:10am from Exeter Services heading northbound.

"This is currently around a dozen vehicles in size and is being accompanied by police vehicles to ensure the safety of all road users."

Rush hour chaos as fuel price protests block motorways - Mark Cosgrove/News Images /News Images
Rush hour chaos as fuel price protests block motorways - Mark Cosgrove/News Images /News Images

Mobile welder Richard Dite, 44, from Maesteg, South Wales said it is costing him over £300 in fuel to get to work every week due to price hikes.

"It's costing me £300 a week before I even get to work and earn anything," Mr Dite told PA news agency.

"My only option soon will be to put the welding gear in the shed and call it a day, maybe go on the doll.

"Face it at this rate I'll be on more that way."

He was joined at Magor Service Station with around a dozen or more other people who have driven this morning across the Prince of Wales Bridge in protest of fuel tax.

Meanwhile, in Shropshire fuel price campaigners held a protest on the M54.

West Mercia Police officers were in attendance as protesters travelled in slow convoy on the motorway between J1 and J4 from 7am until around 8.30am.

"Unfortunately the tactics used by some protesters today compromised the safety of other road users," a force spokesman said.

"Officers gathered evidence during the event and we will take action against those who committed road traffic offences.

"The ability to protest is a fundamental part of democracy, however, when protests start to endanger the public and put the safety of others at risk, appropriate and proportionate action will be taken.

"We apologise for any disruption caused this morning and thank the public for their patience and co-operation."

'You can hardly make a living anymore'

Gwent Police warned protesters that it was aware of "driving offences" being committed during the fuel protest.

"We are aware of driving offences being committed during the planned protest on the M4," a spokesman said.

"We are committed to increasing the safety of all road users in Gwent and beyond.

"We urge all motorists to drive carefully, responsibly and within the limits of the law."

Martin Crowley, 48, from Cardiff said he is a self-employed exotic animal courier and said fuel prices are damaging his livelihood.

"Fuel cost me £280 over two days last week. It's unbelievable.

"You can hardly make a living any more," Mr Crowley said.

In Wales, protest organisers were told by police before leaving they could not stop and must drive no slower than 30mph.

Some protesters said they intend to meet in the middle and block the motorway.

A Government spokesman said: "While we respect the right to protest, people's day-to-day lives should not be disrupted, especially on busy motorways where lives are put at risk and resulting traffic delays will only add to fuel use.

"The new Public Order Bill will make it a criminal offence to glue yourself to a dangerous motorway, which sees police spending hours trying to safely remove people."

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting