Singapore markets closed
  • Straits Times Index

    3,301.96
    +15.63 (+0.48%)
     
  • S&P 500

    4,210.24
    +87.77 (+2.13%)
     
  • Dow

    33,309.51
    +535.11 (+1.63%)
     
  • Nasdaq

    12,854.80
    +360.88 (+2.89%)
     
  • BTC-USD

    24,483.81
    +1,446.79 (+6.28%)
     
  • CMC Crypto 200

    576.17
    +44.95 (+8.46%)
     
  • FTSE 100

    7,483.47
    -23.64 (-0.31%)
     
  • Gold

    1,807.00
    -6.70 (-0.37%)
     
  • Crude Oil

    92.68
    +0.75 (+0.82%)
     
  • 10-Yr Bond

    2.7860
    0.0000 (0.00%)
     
  • Nikkei

    27,819.33
    -180.63 (-0.65%)
     
  • Hang Seng

    20,082.43
    +471.59 (+2.40%)
     
  • FTSE Bursa Malaysia

    1,505.56
    +13.23 (+0.89%)
     
  • Jakarta Composite Index

    7,160.38
    +74.15 (+1.05%)
     
  • PSE Index

    6,680.68
    +208.84 (+3.23%)
     

What the first FAA-approved drone delivery means for the future of drones in the US

DHL parcel delivery drone
DHL parcel delivery drone

Reuters/Wolfgang Rattay

Australian startup Flirtey completed the first FAA-approved drone delivery in the US last week, carrying a package of medical supplies to a rural health clinic in Virginia. FAA regulations have until now banned such flights, but the FAA granted Flirtey an exemption for a joint venture it’s running with NASA and Virginia Tech university to deliver medical supplies to healthcare organizations in remote parts of the state.

This story was originally sent to thousands of professionals in the Internet of things industry in this morning’s IoT INSIDER newsletter. You can join them — sign up for a RISK FREE trial now »

Amazon and other companies have lobbied the FAA for more drone delivery exemptions, arguing that the current regulations are too strict. The regulations prohibit flying commercial drones beyond the line of sight of their pilot or operator.

The FAA is working on less stringent regulations for commercial drone flights that would allow drones to fly beyond their operators’ line of sight. Those new regulations could be finalized within a year, according to FAA officials testifying before Congress last month. Amazon has said that they will be ready to conduct drone deliveries as soon as the new regulations are enacted. 

However, Flirtey’s delivery isn’t necessarily a sign that the FAA is ready to allow more drone deliveries. The FAA has consistently granted exemptions for drone uses that promote human health and safety, like inspecting parts of oil rigs that can be dangerous for humans to inspect. Flirtey’s delivery falls in line with this health and safety theme, and we expect that theme to drive more drone use cases in the short term than delivery of commercial products.

Here are other stories you need to know from today’s IoT INSIDER:

  • US CONSUMERS DON’T WANT FULLY AUTONOMOUS CARS

  • USING DRONES TO DELIVER SPYWARE

  • IoT DEVICES COULD HELP SAVE LIVES ON THE BATTLEFIELD

  • WOULD YOU PICK UP A HITCHHIKING ROBOT?

Find this article interesting? You can get it delivered to your inbox every weekday morning. Get the jump on your competitors. Try it RISK FREE now »

The post What the first FAA-approved drone delivery means for the future of drones in the US appeared first on Business Insider.

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting