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Singapore Telecommunications Limited (Z74.SI)

SES - SES Delayed Price. Currency in SGD
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2.5200-0.0300 (-1.18%)
At close: 05:14PM SGT
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Previous close2.5500
Open2.5600
Bid2.5200 x 0
Ask2.5300 x 0
Day's range2.5200 - 2.5700
52-week range2.3100 - 2.8800
Volume27,349,900
Avg. volume24,332,249
Market cap41.139B
Beta (5Y monthly)0.55
PE ratio (TTM)21.00
EPS (TTM)0.1200
Earnings date09 Nov 2022 - 14 Nov 2022
Forward dividend & yield0.10 (3.76%)
Ex-dividend date03 Aug 2022
1y target est3.19
  • Reuters SG

    UPDATE 1-Australian regulator, govt team up over data sharing after Optus breach

    Australian prudential regulator said on Thursday it will collaborate with the government and other regulatory bodies for "controlled process" of data sharing between its regulated entities and Singapore Telecommunications' unit Optus. The move comes weeks after Optus, the country's second-largest mobile operator, faced a massive cyberattack that compromised data of up to 10 million customers. The cyberattack, which was followed by a data breach in the country's largest telecoms firm Telstra Corp Ltd earlier this week, served as a wake-up call for regulators and lawmakers to beef up cyber defences.

  • Reuters

    Australia's Optus says 'deeply sorry' for cyberattack

    Australia's second-largest telcoms firm Optus, owned by Singapore Telecommunications, on Saturday ran a full-page apology in major newspapers for a "devastating" cyberattack 10 days ago and pointed affected customers to a new help site. "We're deeply sorry that a cyberattack has happened on our watch," the company said in the notice. "We will be in touch with customers who have had their passport document number exposed," Optus said on its web site.

  • The Guardian

    The biggest hack in history: Australians scramble to change passports and driver licences after Optus telco data debacle

    Government says telecommunications giant ‘left the window open’ for unsophisticated attack that could lead to European-style privacy laws