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USD/JPY (JPY=X)

CCY - CCY Delayed Price. Currency in JPY
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145.2780+0.2100 (+0.1448%)
As of 05:42PM BST. Market open.
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Previous close145.0680
Open145.0960
Bid145.2780
Day's range144.6370 - 145.3490
52-week range111.5220 - 145.8830
Ask145.2790
  • Yahoo Finance

    Stock market: 2022 is exposing 'freaky post-QE financial system plumbing,' BofA says

    The global research team at BofA Securities, led by Michael Hartnett, has navigated the curveballs thrown by 2022 far better than most.

  • Reuters

    Japan spent record of nearly $20.0 billion on intervention to support the yen

    Japan spent up to a record 2.8 trillion yen ($19.7 billion) intervening in the foreign exchange market last week to prop up the yen, Ministry of Finance data showed on Friday, draining nearly 15% of funds it has readily available for intervention. The figure was less than the 3.6 trillion yen estimated by Tokyo money market brokers for Japan's first dollar-selling, yen-buying intervention in 24 years to stem the currency's sharp weakening. The ministry's figure, indicating total spending on currency intervention from Aug. 30 to Sept. 28, is widely believed to have been used entirely for the Sept. 22 intervention.

  • Reuters

    Analysis-U.S. has no appetite to intervene on behalf of falling pound, yen

    The financial turmoil emanating from Britain and Japan is not yet enough to prompt the U.S. Treasury to intervene to buoy the battered pound or yen, with officials expressing no urgency to act, a stance foreign exchange market experts say is likely to hold unless much wider market disruptions develop. The Treasury so far has voiced little concern that market volatility will meet that threshold, with the damage largely limited to pound- and yen-denominated assets, which in the United Kingdom's case prompted the Bank of England on Wednesday to buy long-dated UK debt. Federal Reserve officials also appear nonplussed at this time, with Cleveland Fed President Loretta Mester on Thursday saying she sees nothing in U.S. market functioning that would derail the U.S. central bank's efforts to contain inflation through stiff interest rate increases.