Singapore markets close in 2 hours 44 minutes
  • Straits Times Index

    3,010.44
    +14.52 (+0.48%)
     
  • Nikkei

    28,741.14
    +107.68 (+0.38%)
     
  • Hang Seng

    29,972.13
    +329.85 (+1.11%)
     
  • FTSE 100

    6,740.39
    +27.44 (+0.41%)
     
  • BTC-USD

    34,645.30
    -17.32 (-0.05%)
     
  • CMC Crypto 200

    685.51
    -15.10 (-2.16%)
     
  • S&P 500

    3,851.85
    +52.94 (+1.39%)
     
  • Dow

    31,188.38
    +257.86 (+0.83%)
     
  • Nasdaq

    13,457.25
    +260.07 (+1.97%)
     
  • Gold

    1,873.70
    +7.20 (+0.39%)
     
  • Crude Oil

    53.28
    +0.04 (+0.08%)
     
  • 10-Yr Bond

    1.0900
    0.0000 (0.00%)
     
  • FTSE Bursa Malaysia

    1,598.17
    -3.71 (-0.23%)
     
  • Jakarta Composite Index

    6,430.05
    +108.19 (+1.71%)
     
  • PSE Index

    7,140.29
    -58.16 (-0.81%)
     

Thousands of unsecured medical records were exposed online

Kris Holt
·Contributing Writer
·1-min read

Thousands of medical records for US patients, some of whom are children, were exposed in yet another lapse in health data security. A company named nTreatment, which handles records for clients in the healthcare industry, failed to protect one of its cloud servers with a password, according to TechCrunch.

The server stored around 109,000 files, including doctors' notes, third-party test results and insurance claims, along with some of nTreatment's internal documents. Almost all of that sensitive information was reportedly viewable through a web browser.

It's unclear how long the data remained exposed, though it has now been secured. The server was used for general-purpose storage, nTreatment co-founder Gregory Katz told TechCrunch. The company will alert regulators and affected providers about the situation, Katz said.

Last year, ProPublica and Bayerischer Rundfunk, a German broadcaster, found at least 187 servers holding medical data on US patients that were not password protected. As a result, millions of test results and hundreds of thousands of x-rays were exposed online for anyone to find.