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EU's executive would view Brexit legal remedies from end September

·1-min read
FILE PHOTO: European Union flags flutter outside the European Commission headquarters in Brussels

EU's executive would view Brexit legal remedies from end September

FILE PHOTO: European Union flags flutter outside the European Commission headquarters in Brussels

BRUSSELS (Reuters) - The European Commission will look into legal remedies at the end of the month if Britain does not adjust the parts of a domestic bill which breaches the Brexit divorce deal agreed last year, EU Commission Vice-President Maros Sefcovic said on Tuesday.

Sefcovic, speaking after a meeting of Europe ministers in Brussels, said that the Commission, which is negotiating on behalf of the 27 EU members, was asking London to withdraw the contentious parts of the bill by the end of September.

"After that we would look into the question of legal remedies," he told a news conference.

A new crisis in EU-UK talks has emerged after British Prime Minister Boris Johnson proposed new domestic laws for Britain that would undercut the Brexit divorce international treaty, known as the Withdrawal Agreement.

"There are other remedies which we can use still during the transition period but also after Jan. 1 because the Withdrawal Agreement is signed, ratified is part of international law and we are studying very carefully all the legal options we have on the table," Sefcovic said.

He said that the Commission would keep its calm and continue talking with Britain to find a solution to the issue, and one that left the Withdrawal Agreement intact.

Earlier, he said that the European Union would negotiate with Britain in good faith.

"We will continue to engage with the UK in good faith, building on progress already achieved," he told reporters.

(Reporting by Jan Strupczewski, writing by Robin Emmott and Philip Blenkinsop; editing by Foo Yun Chee)