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Apple union victory, Elon Musk vs. the SEC, and abortion: 3 legal stories to watch

·Reporter
·3-min read
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This holiday-shortened week, Yahoo Finance is tracking three major legal stories: the Supreme Court’s impending decision on whether to overturn Roe v. Wade; Apple's response to a historic labor union vote; and Tesla CEO Elon Musk's ongoing feud with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

Here's more on these three stories:

Will the Supreme Court overturn Roe v. Wade?

The case is slated to determine whether the U.S. will continue to guarantee a Constitutional right to elective abortion, or whether the legality of terminating those pregnancies will be left to the states.

A draft majority opinion leaked to Politico in May showed the court had voted to overturn its nearly 50-year-old decision securing the federal right to abortion in Roe v. Wade and its 30-year-old case law in Planned Parenthood v. Casey securing that right up until “viability,” or when a fetus can survive outside the womb.

The court is expected to issue a ruling by the end of June, in a decision that has various implications for the business world — from companies that track menstrual cycles to those that make abortion drugs. Companies will also have to decide whether to pay for or offer health benefits to employees to go out of state for an abortion.

From left, Beila Kraus, 15, far left, of Westchester, N.Y., and Ian Davey, 19, of Cleveland, Ohio, Zoe Warren, 19, Bethesda, Md., and at far right is Abby Thomas, 27, of Los Angeles, join protesters outside the Supreme Court in support of abortion rights, Wednesday, June 15, 2022, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
From left, Beila Kraus, 15, far left, of Westchester, N.Y., and Ian Davey, 19, of Cleveland, Ohio, Zoe Warren, 19, Bethesda, Md., and at far right is Abby Thomas, 27, of Los Angeles, join protesters outside the Supreme Court in support of abortion rights, Wednesday, June 15, 2022, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

A win for an Apple store union

We’re also watching Apple’s (APPL) response to a historic labor union vote on Saturday that for the first time in the company’s 46-year history gave U.S. workers the right to representation. The union victory, won by Apple store retail employees in Towson, Maryland, totaled 65 in favor of unionization and 33 against.

The union win comes as workers across tech and retail sectors ramp up petitions for labor representation. Now that the National Labor Board has certified the representation, Apple must begin to bargain. The company has seven days from the union's victory to decide whether to raise objections to the election, a practice common for companies that have lost union votes.

Elon Musk vs. The SEC

FILE - Elon Musk founder, CEO, and chief engineer/designer of SpaceX jokes with reporters as he pretends to search for an answer to a question on a cell phone during a news conference after a Falcon 9 SpaceX rocket test flight to demonstrate the capsule's emergency escape system at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Sunday, Jan. 19, 2020.  Many people are puzzled on what a Elon Musk takeover of Twitter would mean for the company and even whether he’ll go through with the deal.  If the 50-year-old Musk’s gambit has made anything clear it’s that he thrives on contradiction. (AP Photo/John Raoux, File)
FILE - Elon Musk founder, CEO, and chief engineer/designer of SpaceX jokes with reporters as he pretends to search for an answer to a question on a cell phone during a news conference. (AP Photo/John Raoux, File)

Tesla (TSLA) and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk is expected to push harder for relief from an agreement with the SEC that requires a Tesla lawyer to review certain Twitter posts that concern the electric vehicle company.

On Wednesday, a lawyer for Musk notified a federal district court in Manhattan that Musk would appeal a judge's ruling that refused to terminate the 2018 deal with the SEC that interfered with the CEO's liberty to post tweets about Tesla.

Musk entered the agreement over the SEC’s allegations that a 2018 Tweet saying he'd secured funding to take Tesla private at $420 per share was false and misleading.

Alexis Keenan is a legal reporter for Yahoo Finance. Follow Alexis on Twitter @alexiskweed.

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