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40 Purchases Buyers Almost Always Regret

FG Trade / iStock.com
FG Trade / iStock.com

Money is tight for many Americans. Even if you’re one of the lucky few who has their finances in order, there’s no use throwing money away on a purchase you’ll later regret.

Save yourself the buyer’s remorse and avoid making these 40 purchases this year.

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sattahipbeach / Shutterstock.com
sattahipbeach / Shutterstock.com

DVDs and Blu-ray Discs

Physical discs are relics of a bygone era, and — just like cable — DVDs and Blu-rays are now playing second fiddle to streaming services.

An inexpensive DVD at Target sells for $5, and Blu-ray will only cost you an additional 99 cents. Even those bargain prices are too high, however. With movie streaming platforms like Hulu starting at $7.99 per month for unlimited access to movies, there isn’t a financial reason to buy physical discs anymore.

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hedgehog94 / Getty Images/iStockphoto
hedgehog94 / Getty Images/iStockphoto

Extended Warranties

Extended warranties for electronics and appliances are almost never worth the money, according to Consumer Reports.

“Today’s appliances are fairly reliable,” Dan DiClerico, a former home expert with Home Advisor, told Consumer Reports. “The chance that your refrigerator or dishwasher actually needs a repair during the extended warranty period is pretty low.”

And in the event you do need a repair, it will likely cost about the same as you would have paid for a warranty.

Learn More: 6 Valuable Everyday Items You Should Never Throw Away

bonetta / iStock.com
bonetta / iStock.com

Boats

The ticket price for boats is often high on its own, and that doesn’t account for all the other expenses that come with a boat purchase — taxes, transportation from the purchase point to your home or dock, maintenance and insurance. This is a purchase that can truly sink your budget.

ArtMarie / Getty Images
ArtMarie / Getty Images

Timeshares

You might think of a timeshare as an “investment” — and if you do, it’s most certainly a bad one. Unlike a good investment, timeshares do not generate income or increase in value. And they cost a lot, between the initial loan and interest, and then annual maintenance fees on top of that.

Plus, you could feel like you have to go back to the same place at the same time every year to make your timeshare “worth it,” when instead, you could find bargain trips to different destinations each year.

©Shutterstock.com
©Shutterstock.com

Over-the-Top Weddings

Weddings should be memorable and special, but it’s easy to get caught up in the planning process and totally blow your budget.

“When you’re starting out, the worst thing you can do is put yourself in debt for your wedding,” Kevin O’Leary, an investor on ABC’s “Shark Tank” and personal finance author, told CNBC. “I know it sounds romantic to spend a lot of money — it’s crazy to do that.”

You’ll likely regret starting your new life as a couple thousands of dollars in the hole.

djedzura / Getty Images/iStockphoto
djedzura / Getty Images/iStockphoto

Pricey Engagement Rings

Conventional wisdom suggests you should spend three months’ salary on an engagement ring, but experts say you should spend no more than 5% of your salary.

“Far too many people [spend] too much on an engagement ring, and then, they have very little money left for their other financial goals, such as home buying,” Ryan Marshall, a certified financial planner and partner at Ela Financial Group, told CNBC.

Read Next: Nearly Half of Americans Struggle To Pay Their Utility Bills: 5 Ways To Save

Django / Getty Images
Django / Getty Images

Desktop Computers

Unless you need the extra computing power a desktop would provide, you’re likely better off spending less money and buying a laptop. Laptops are portable, often come with a webcam and other accessories included and require less power, which will save you on your electricity bill, too.

apomares / Getty Images
apomares / Getty Images

Camping Gear You’ll Never Use Again

If you don’t camp regularly, there’s no point in buying a bunch of expensive gear. You can rent tents, sleeping bags and sleeping pads instead of paying a lot of money for equipment that will end up collecting dust.

izusek / Getty Images
izusek / Getty Images

Video Cameras

Smartphones have pretty much replaced the need for video cameras. Why lug around extra equipment when you can take high-quality videos on your phone?

YakobchukOlena / Getty Images/iStockphoto
YakobchukOlena / Getty Images/iStockphoto

Printers

Printers are expensive and take up a lot of space. And after the initial purchase, you’ll keep having to pay for paper and ink. Unless you need to print documents out regularly, you’re better off heading to Office Depot, Staples or FedEx for the rare occasion you do need a physical copy of something.

Find Out: I’m a Frugal Shopper: 4 Items I Always Buy Secondhand To Save Money

Igor Palamarchuk / Shutterstock.com
Igor Palamarchuk / Shutterstock.com

Pedometers

Nowadays, most smartphones keep track of your steps, so there’s no need to buy an external pedometer. Plus, when you buy a pedometer, you have to remember to wear it, whereas you probably have your phone on you at all times.

slobo / Getty Images
slobo / Getty Images

Exercise Machines

Going to the gym might not be an option for you — or you might not feel comfortable using a gym — but this doesn’t mean you should spend thousands of dollars on expensive home gym equipment.

There are plenty of exercises you can do using just your body weight, or you can invest in lower-cost equipment like hand weights and resistance bands.

Danica Jakovljevic / Getty Images/iStockphoto
Danica Jakovljevic / Getty Images/iStockphoto

Juicers and Other Expensive Kitchen Gadgets

Juicers can be very expensive, and it requires a ton of fresh produce to make a single glass of juice. There’s also a lot of time and cleanup involved. Unless you’re prepared to spend 10 to 15 minutes every morning to create a cup of juice, you’re probably better off shelling out the cash for an already bottled pressed juice.

Juicers aren’t the only kitchen gadget you’ll likely regret buying. There are a number of appliances on the market that only have a single, very specific use, and so likely won’t be worth the investment. Do you really need an egg cooker, dehydrator or pasta maker? Probably not, and these are gadgets you’ll probably use once or twice and then never again.

©Shutterstock.com
©Shutterstock.com

Unnecessary Baby Products

The baby product market is now a multi-billion-dollar industry, according to Statista, but many of the products out there are simply not worth the money. According to Parents.com, wipe warmers, diaper disposal systems, special “baby” detergent, baby timers, expensive crib bedding and baby food processors are all unnecessary purchases.

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©Shutterstock.com
©Shutterstock.com

Pools

Pools can end up being a huge money pit. In addition to the initial cost of installing a pool, you can expect to spend $80 – $350 monthly, according to Home Advisor, with total yearly maintenance starting at $1,200 then going up.

Plus, you’ll also have to purchase a pool vacuum for $50 – $200 to keep everything nice and clean.

piola666 / Getty Images
piola666 / Getty Images

Hot Tubs

Hot tubs have a lower initial cost than pools, but they could still end up being a purchase you regret, especially after seeing the increase in your water bill.

AS Inc. / Shutterstock.com
AS Inc. / Shutterstock.com

Luxury Cars

There are some pros to buying a luxury car, but they don’t outweigh the costs associated with owning one. Most luxury cars are made with higher-quality materials, have better handling and might provide a better ride than a mid-level car. However, luxury models of mid-level brands often come with the same bells and whistles as a luxury car for less.

For example, a Cadillac Escalade and a Chevrolet Tahoe share many mechanical components, but the 2024 Escalade starts at $83,943, whereas the 2024 Tahoe starts at $56,843, according to Edmunds.

There are also additional costs associated with owning a luxury car compared to a standard vehicle. Most luxury cars require premium gas, come with higher insurance rates and have more expensive replacement parts and repair costs.

domin_domin / Getty Images
domin_domin / Getty Images

Fine China

Think twice before adding fine china to your wedding registry. You likely won’t use it very much, and it could take up a lot of space in your kitchen.

Explore More: 6 Expensive Costco Items That Are Definitely Worth the Cost

Alexander Lukatskiy / Shutterstock.com
Alexander Lukatskiy / Shutterstock.com

Collectibles

If you’re buying a collectible because it brings you joy, go for it, but if you’re stocking your shelves with things you don’t actually like, because you think they’ll be worth something one day, you’re probably wasting your money.

jacoblund / Getty Images/iStockphoto
jacoblund / Getty Images/iStockphoto

Expensive Clothes You Can Only Wear Once

Whether it’s a prom dress, wedding dress or other special occasion attire that you won’t be able to wear again, you’ll probably regret spending a ton of money for it. And don’t bank on being able to resell the garment.

bentaboe / Getty Images/iStockphoto
bentaboe / Getty Images/iStockphoto

Oversized Desserts and Cocktails

Some restaurants sell massive desserts and cocktail drinks as a novelty, and you might be tempted to buy them “just for fun” — but when you’re halfway through that giant sundae, you’ll probably wish you had just ordered one scoop of ice cream.

CSA-Plastock / Getty Images/iStockphoto
CSA-Plastock / Getty Images/iStockphoto

‘As Seen on TV’ Products

Some “as seen on TV” products are truly out there — does anyone really need sauna pants or mitts that peel potatoes? — but even products that are more practical are usually marked up way above their actual value.

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sturti / Getty Images
sturti / Getty Images

Products Sold By Door-to-Door Salespeople

Whether they’re selling a vacuum cleaner or a magazine subscription, door-to-door salespeople can be very persuasive and may convince you to buy something you don’t actually want or need. It’s best to just politely say no to whatever it is they’re selling.

Globalphotogroup / Shutterstock.com
Globalphotogroup / Shutterstock.com

Pricey Replacement Parts

Whether it’s your car or your furnace that needs repair, sometimes it’s worth it to just bite the bullet and buy a new one rather than continue to pay for expensive replacement parts.

mphillips007 / Getty Images
mphillips007 / Getty Images

Lottery Tickets

While it might seem tempting to spend two bucks for the chance to win millions, the odds are not in your favor, and those dollars are better off generating interest in your savings account. Your chance of winning a Powerball grand prize is only about one in 292 million. To put that in perspective, your odds of being killed by an asteroid impact are about one in 74 million.

©GOBankingRates.com
©GOBankingRates.com

High-End Gym Memberships

A membership to Equinox costs over $200 a month at many locations, while an average gym membership would only cost you between $30-$50 per month. Although the machines might be upgraded and the facilities might be swankier at a luxury gym, you can still get a good workout at an affordable gym and save about $150 a month.

Check Out: 7 Appliances Frugal Homeowners Steer Clear Of

Rawpixel / Getty Images/iStockphoto
Rawpixel / Getty Images/iStockphoto

The ‘It’ Kids’ Toy

Kids tend to get bored with toys easily, so there’s no point in shelling out $100 or more to buy them the “it” toy of the moment.

Mikbiz / Shutterstock.com
Mikbiz / Shutterstock.com

Premium Rental Cars

Unless you need the extra room for passengers or additional trunk space, it makes financial sense to opt for the economy class of rental cars. If you’re renting a car for multiple days, the savings you’ll get from choosing economy over premium can really add up.

Elodie_Saracco / iStock.com
Elodie_Saracco / iStock.com

Daily Grab-and-Go Meals

Grabbing a bagel on your way to work every morning might be an easy option, but it’s probably not the best choice for your health or your wallet. Even healthy grab-and-go breakfasts could end up being a financial regret.

One $7 smoothie isn’t so bad, but what if you have one every day for a year? That’s over $2,550 that could’ve been added to your savings.

Take the extra time to make a nutritious meal at home that will keep you satisfied for longer and keep more money in your bank account.

©Shutterstock.com
©Shutterstock.com

Car Upgrades

Some car upgrades can lower your car’s value. For example, you might think that adding a coffee-can muffler makes your car “cooler,” but you’ll likely regret that decision when you want to resell your vehicle.

Learn More: Buying a Used Car: The Best Age and Mileage To Get Great Value

GlaserStudios / Getty Images/iStockphoto
GlaserStudios / Getty Images/iStockphoto

Season Tickets

Season tickets for your favorite college or pro sports team can come at a high price — and that doesn’t account for all the other expenses that come with regularly going to games, such as parking and concessions.

filadendron / Getty Images
filadendron / Getty Images

Designer Clothes and Shoes

If you spend hundreds of dollars on a pair of shoes, you’ll either want to wear them all the time to get your money’s worth, leading to quickly wearing them out, or they’ll sit in your closet because you’re afraid they’ll get scuffed. Either way, designer items are probably not the best use of your funds.

LumiNola / Getty Images
LumiNola / Getty Images

Purchases From Websites You’ve Never Heard Of

You’re constantly being bombarded with targeted ads whenever you go online, and it can be tempting to click through to purchase, even if it’s from a site you’ve never heard of before. This is particularly true with women’s clothing. Many women end up with items that look nothing like what was pictured online when they order from unknown sites.

ByoungJoo / Getty Images/iStockphoto
ByoungJoo / Getty Images/iStockphoto

Clothes That Don’t Fit You

If you see a clothing item you really love on sale, but it’s not available in your size, you might be inclined to buy it anyway. Clothes that are too small won’t be flattering, and clothes that are too large will require tailoring, which will add costs onto the “good deal” you got by buying the item on sale.

Be Aware: 7 Popular Clothing Brands the Middle Class Can’t Afford Anymore

©Shutterstock.com
©Shutterstock.com

Cheap Paper Towels

When it comes to buying paper towels, you get what you pay for. You might feel like you’re saving money by buying bargain paper towels, but if they don’t work well, you end up having to use more than you normally would have if you had just sprung for a better brand.

©Shutterstock.com
©Shutterstock.com

Cheap Furniture

You might save money on the initial purchase when you buy cheap furniture, but you’ll likely end up having to replace it much sooner than if you had just invested in quality pieces.

Luis Echeverri Urrea / Shutterstock.com
Luis Echeverri Urrea / Shutterstock.com

Cheap Kitchen Knives

Like furniture, knives are something that’s worth investing in. If you buy a cheap set, they’ll likely get dull quickly and need to be replaced.

AndreyPopov / Getty Images/iStockphoto
AndreyPopov / Getty Images/iStockphoto

Low-Quality Appliances

Even “cheap” appliances usually cost a few hundred bucks, but they likely won’t last as long as better-quality appliances. Make sure you buy a brand you trust from a retailer you trust.

Discover More: The 50 Happiest States in America and How Much It Costs to Live There

cynoclub / Getty Images/iStockphoto
cynoclub / Getty Images/iStockphoto

Purebred Dogs

A purebred dog from a breeder can cost thousands of dollars. In comparison, the cost of adopting or rescuing ranges between $0 and $500.

In addition to saving an animal’s life, there are added financial benefits to adopting. Most rescue dogs are mixed-breed, meaning they are likely to live longer and cost less in vet bills than a purebred dog. Purebreds are more likely to develop health problems — such as breathing difficulties and hip dysplasia — which can be expensive to treat.

BenDC / Getty Images/iStockphoto
BenDC / Getty Images/iStockphoto

A House You Can’t Actually Afford

The term “house poor” exists for a reason. This is what happens when you blow your budget on a home and end up having to use the majority of your income to cover mortgage payments, insurance, taxes, maintenance and utilities, leaving you with little money to afford much else. Aim to dedicate just 30% of your income to housing expenses, so your “dream home” doesn’t turn into a financial nightmare.

Ashleigh Ray and J. Arky contributed to the reporting for this article.

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This article originally appeared on GOBankingRates.com: 40 Purchases Buyers Almost Always Regret